• 05
    Jan
    Articles, Instagram Links
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    By Jason Wilford When it comes to learning the guitar, I find there are two types of guitarists (and many in between): those who likes to learn something exactly how it was played on a recording or written down, and those who like to focus on doing their own version (in other words, doing your own thing). There’s not a right or wrong way to do this, but there are valid points to both sides of this debate — should you play something note for note, or make your own version of it? I want you to be able to decide for yourself what will work best for you, so here are some benefits for both sides. Arguments In Favour

  • 06
    Aug
    Articles, Instagram Links
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    By Jason Wilford I know many people that feel like it’s impossible to find the time to continue practicing guitar throughout the summer at the same level they were throughout the winter months. For guitarists, the winter can be a time where it’s really easy to grab a guitar and hang out inside practicing for hours (especially in Canada). When the summer rolls around, however, we all find ourselves doing other activities and it may feel like the guitar is taking a backseat to everything else. A common response to this by many of us is to just give in and not think too much about it. Some of us stop working as hard, slow down on practicing, and maybe even just

  • 04
    Feb
    Articles, Instagram Links
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    Learning songs from other artists is a great way to learn how to play music. It allows us to learn the techniques and styles of different musicians, and figure out how we can sound good by mimicking what others have done. But what happens when we don’t want to simply just copy other people anymore? How can you make a song sound like it’s your own rather than just playing a piece note-for-note as other artists have played it? Today I’m going to share some ideas with you on how to put your own spin on the songs you learn so that they can begin taking on a new life. 1. Change the rhythm or feel of the song This

  • 03
    Dec
    Articles, Instagram Links
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    By Jason Wilford Single note guitar playing can be defined as playing notes one at a time, rather than playing multiple notes at time. Chords would be an example of playing multiple notes at a time, whereas examples of single note guitar playing can be seen when a guitarist takes a solo, plays a catchy riff, or any other situations where just one note is being played at a time. Quite often I have students who are quite adamant that they only want to learn chords. They only want to be a rhythm guitar player, after all, so why should they bother doing something that they don’t need? I totally get where this feeling comes from - it’s natural to

  • 26
    Nov
    Articles, Instagram Links, Mini-lessons
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    By Jason Wilford If I had to single out the most essential and important trick for me when it comes to playing blues lead guitar, it would be exactly what I'm going to talk about here. Obviously blues lead guitar can't be singled down to just one aspect - there are so many facets to the blues that it would be impossible to contribute the sound to just one thing. But for me, this trick is definitely my favourite and most used. To find out what I'm talking about, click and watch the lesson below. I have also included some supplemental material for you to work with, but it will make more sense once you watch the video. Supplemental Materials

  • 16
    Oct
    Articles, Instagram Links
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    Playing music can be one of the most exciting feelings, especially as you’re learning. But part of playing an instrument inevitably involves feeling uninspired and unmotivated at some time or another. This is normal for any musician to go through, so when this feeling strikes, don’t feel like it’s the end of the world. In this moment, the most important thing for you to work on is getting that motivation back. A big part of this is ensuring that you’re still practicing and playing your instrument, but sometimes some extra help from external forces can help you feel motivated so that you are excited to pick the instrument up again. Here are some quick ideas to spark your motivation and