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  • 10
    Dec
    Guest Articles
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    Playing an instrument is very rewarding for both the child and the parent. To see the progress that they make over their guitar play journey and over a lifetime. One of the essential elements to make them improve their guitar playing is practice. For all children, they will be more motivated at certain times compared to others when it comes to practicing the guitar. There will always be challenges and difficulties when learning new things on any instrument. The key is overcoming those challenges through determination and practice. This really helps the child build confidence in the fact that when they work hard, they can get result from it. Playing guitar gives them a very clear example to reference from

  • 03
    Dec
    Uncategorized
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    By Jason Wilford Single note guitar playing can be defined as playing notes one at a time, rather than playing multiple notes at time. Chords would be an example of playing multiple notes at a time, whereas examples of single note guitar playing can be seen when a guitarist takes a solo, plays a catchy riff, or any other situations where just one note is being played at a time. Quite often I have students who are quite adamant that they only want to learn chords. They only want to be a rhythm guitar player, after all, so why should they bother doing something that they don’t need? I totally get where this feeling comes from - it’s natural to

  • 26
    Nov
    Articles, Mini-lessons
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    By Jason Wilford If I had to single out the most essential and important trick for me when it comes to playing blues lead guitar, it would be exactly what I'm going to talk about here. Obviously blues lead guitar can't be singled down to just one aspect - there are so many facets to the blues that it would be impossible to contribute the sound to just one thing. But for me, this trick is definitely my favourite and most used. To find out what I'm talking about, click and watch the lesson below. I have also included some supplemental material for you to work with, but it will make more sense once you watch the video. Supplemental Materials

  • 07
    Nov
    Guest Articles
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    By Byron Marks One skill guitar teachers usually overlook when teaching their students to play guitar is communicating with other musicians. Yes, the teacher communicates with their student but they rarely teach the student how to communicate with other musicians.  Regardless of the setting that you are playing in; playing around the campfire with friends, local jam nights to jam nights, live gigs with a band, working in a recording studio or just jamming with friends for fun. There will be plenty of situations where you will have to communicate with other musicians. You will have to be able to do this quickly and effectively. Because communication isn’t usually taught during guitar lessons; most guitarists won’t understand how important being

  • 16
    Oct
    Articles
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    Playing music can be one of the most exciting feelings, especially as you’re learning. But part of playing an instrument inevitably involves feeling uninspired and unmotivated at some time or another. This is normal for any musician to go through, so when this feeling strikes, don’t feel like it’s the end of the world. In this moment, the most important thing for you to work on is getting that motivation back. A big part of this is ensuring that you’re still practicing and playing your instrument, but sometimes some extra help from external forces can help you feel motivated so that you are excited to pick the instrument up again. Here are some quick ideas to spark your motivation and

  • 01
    Oct
    Articles
    Written By proguitarstudio
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    A Primer On How To Build Chords By Jason Wilford One of the first steps to understanding how to build chords is to know how to play at least a one- octave major scale on the guitar. This is going to be your reference point for everything, so make sure you know how to play this well, both ascending and descending. Here is the C major scale: The next thing we have to do is assign each of the notes a number. There are 7 notes in the scale, with the 8th note being the first note repeated an octave higher. We will number the notes starting on C, all the way up to the next octave. Keep in mind

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